List of Hindu deities -Prana Kishore

List of Hindu deities -Prana Kishore

Hinduism is the dominant religion of the Indian subcontinent. It comprises three major traditions, ShaivismVaishnavism and Shaktism,[1] whose followers considered ShivaVishnu and Shakti (also called asDevi) to be the supreme deity respectively. Most of the other deities were either related to them or different forms (incarnations) of these deities. Hinduism has been called the “oldest religion” in the world, and many practitioners refer to Hinduism as “the eternal law“. (Sanātana Dharma).[2] Given below is a list of the chief Hindu deities followed by a list of Hindu deities

Para Brahman

According to Adi Shankara, there is only one supreme Para Brahman, and all of the other deities are its forms and expansions.

Under terms of some schools of Vedanta, it has three modal aspects, with the highest being Para Brahman. Para Brahman means Supreme Brahman, or Supreme Cosmic Spirit. Although an ineffable entity, it could be said to be that which contains and pervades the universe. Para Brahman, from beyond, encompasses the transcendent and immanent ultimate reality, Brahman, The Absolute Truth is both subject and object, so there is no qualitative difference. Terms like Parameshvara, IshvaraBhagavan, Brahman, and Paramatma are held to be synonymous with Para Brahman.

Hindu sects like ShaivismVaishnavism, and Shaktism have a concept of Para Brahman, identifying it with the deities ShivaVishnu and Adi Parashakti/Shakti (the Goddess) respectively. However, in contrast with Vaishnavism (in which Para Brahman denotes Saguna Brahman as Vishnu), either Saguna Brahman or the impersonal Nirguna Brahman may be connotated by other sects.

Trimurti and Tridevi[


Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva with their consorts.

Main articles: Trimurti and Tridevi

Shiva and Vishnu are regarded as Mahādevas (“great gods” ) due to their central positions in worship and scriptures.[3] These two along with Brahma are considered the Trimurti—the three aspects of the universal supreme God. These three aspects symbolize the entire circle of samsara in Hinduism: Brahma as creator, Vishnu as preserver or protector, and Shiva as destroyer or judge. The Hindu trinity consisted of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, the followers of the last two formed two major sects.

The Tridevi or triplet goddesses of Hinduism have equal importance as the Trimurti and function as their consorts. Brahma is creator, so he needs knowledge or goddess Saraswati (Vaak) to create. Vishnu is preserver, so he needs the goddess of wealth and prosperity, goddess Lakshmi (Shri). Finally, Shiva is destroyer and re-creator, so he needs goddess ParvatiDurga, or Kali for power. They are the various manifestations of Goddess, Shakti.

Popular deities


Ganesha

In their personal religious practices, Hindus may worship primarily one or another of these aspects, known as their Ishta Devata or Ishvara[4] (chosen deity).[5] The particular deities worshipped are a matter of individual preference,[6] although regional and family traditions can play a large part in influencing this choice.[7] Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism, and theGanapatya sects of Hinduism states that Vishnu, Shiva, Devi (shakti), and Ganesha respectively equate to Brahman, and that all other deities are aspects of their chosen deity.[8]

Besides the Trimurti and Tridevi and aspects of the goddesses already mentioned, Shiva’s sons Ganesha and Kartikeya, Vishnu’s avatars like Rama and Krishna are popular deities.

Some deities have regional popularity. Regional forms of Vishnu include JagannathVithoba and Venkateshwara.

Avatars as incarnations of gods

Many denominations of Hinduism, such as Vaishnavism and some schools of Saivism, teach that occasionally, a god comes to Earth as a human being to help humans in their struggle toward enlightenment and salvation (moksha). Such an incarnation of a god is called an avatar, or avatāra. Hinduism teaches that there have been multiple avatars throughout history and that there will be more.

Ten avatars of Vishnu

Main article: Dasavatara


The Dasavatara

The most famous of the divine incarnations are Rama, whose life is depicted in the Ramayana, and Krishna, whose life is depicted in the Mahābhārata and the Bhagavata Purana. The Bhagavad Gita, which contains the spiritual teachings of Krishna, is one of the most widely read scriptures in Hinduism. Mohini is a female incarnation of Vishnu who appeared during the early struggle between the Deva and Asura.

  1. Matsya, the fish, appeared in the Satya Yuga. Represents the beginning of life.
  2. Kurma, the tortoise, appeared in the Satya Yuga. Represents a human embryo just growing tiny legs, with a huge belly.
  3. Varaha, the boar,appeared in the Satya Yuga. Represents a human embryo which is almost ready. Its features are visible.
  4. Narasimha, the Man-Lion (Nara = man, simha = lion), appeared in the Satya Yuga. Represents a newborn baby, hairy and cranky, bawling and full of blood.Regarded as the greatest and most powerful avatar.
  5. Vamana, the Dwarf, appeared in the Treta Yuga. Represents a young child.
  6. Parashurama, Rama with the axe, appeared in the Treta Yuga. Represents both an angry young man and a grumpy old man simultaneously.
  7. Rama, Sri Ramachandra, the prince and king of Ayodhya, appeared in the Treta Yuga. Represents a married man with children and depicts and ideal society. one man one one wife etc..,. Lord Rama is considered Purna avatar, which means full incarnation of Vishnu.
  8. Krishna, Krishna is considered Purna avatar, which means full incarnation of Vishnu. Represents a more realistic society. As chaotic as it looks there is clear demarcation between right and wrong.
  9. Kalki (“Eternity”, or “time”, or “The Destroyer of foulness”), who is expected to appear at the end of Kali Yuga, the time period in which we currently exist, though it has not happened yet. However, over the centuries many sects have believed their spiritual leader to be Kalki. For example, Ismaili Khojas, a Muslim group from Gujarat and Sindh who are followers of Aga khan, believe in the 10 incarnations of Vishnu.

Some consider Balarama, brother of Krishna, to be the eighth Avatar of Vishnu. They make Krishna the ninth avatar and delete Buddha.[9] But other legends state that Balarama was an incarnation of Sheshaand hence Buddha, founder of Buddhism, is the ninth avatar of Vishnu and Kalki the tenth one who is yet to come at the end of Kaliyuga. Helmuth von Glasenapp attributed these developments to a Hindu desire to absorb Buddhism in a peaceful manner, both to win Buddhists to Vaishnavism and also to account for the fact that such a significant heresy could exist in India.[10]

Devas and devis

Main articles: Deva (Hinduism) and Devi


Indra is the god-king of heaven and god of thunder, lightning and rain.

The pantheon in Śrauta consists of many deities. Gods are called devas (or devatās) and goddesses are called devis. The most ancient Rigvedic deities included IndraAgni,SomaVarunaMitraSavitrRudraPrajapatiVishnuAryaman, and the Ashvins. Important goddesses were SarasvatiUshas, and Prithvi. Later scriptures called the Puranasrecount traditional stories about each individual deity, such as Ganesha and Hanuman, and avatars such as Rama and Krishna.

The Thirty-three gods of the Vedas are:

Adityas

  • Mitra, the patron god of oaths and of friendship,
  • Varuṇa, the patron god of water and the oceans,
  • Śakra, also called Indra, the king of gods, and the god of rains
  • Bhaga, god of wealth
  • Vivasvat, also called Ravi or Savitṛ,
  • Tvāṣṭṛ, the smith among the gods,
  • Pūṣan, patron god of travellers and herdsmen, god of roads,
  • Dhātṛ, god of health and magic, also called Dhūti
  • Yama, god of Dharma (moral ethics), of death and of justice.

Vasus

Assistants of Indra and of Vishnu

  • Agni the “Fire” god, also called Anala or “living”,
  • Vāyu the “Wind”, the air god, also called Anila (“wind”)
  • Dyauṣ the “Sky” god, also called Dyeus and Prabhāsa or the “shining dawn”
  • Pṛthivī the “Earth” god, also called Dharā or “support”
  • Sūrya the “Sun” god, also called Pratyūsha, (“break of dawn”, but often used to mean simply “light”), the Saura sectary worshipped Sūrya as their chief deity.
  • Soma the “Moon” god, also called Chandra
  • Aha (“pervading”) or Āpa (‘water’ or ether), also called Antarikṣa the “Atmosphere” or “Space” god,
  • Dhruva (“motionless”) the Polestar, also called Nakṣatra the god of the “Stars”,

Rudras

They are the 8 personifications of god Rudra and have various names.


Ashvins


]

The Ashvins (also called the Nāsatyas) were twin gods. Nasatya is also the name of one twin, while the other is called Dasra.

List in alphabetical order

Most of the Hindu temples are dedicated to ShivaVishnu (including his incarnations Krishna and Rama), Shakti (the mother goddess, hence including the forms of Durga and Kali and the goddesses Lakshmiand Saraswati), Ganesh and Hanuman.[7][8][9] The Hindu scriptures claimed that there were 33 Crore or 330 million (1 Crore = 10 million) gods. The number might be figurative but there are several names and forms for the multitude of gods. [10] Given below is an incomplete list of deities.

A

  • Acyutah, another name of Vishnu.
  • Adimurti one of Vishnu’s avatars.
  • Aditi is mother of the Devas.
  • Adityas, are the offspring of Aditi.
  • Agni* is the god of fire, and acceptor of sacrifices.
  • Ammavaru goddess who laid the egg that hatched Brahma, Shiva and Vishnu.
  • Anala “fire” in Sanskrit, equated among Agni.
  • Anilais one of the Vasus, gods of the elements of the cosmos. He is equated with the wind god Vāyu, Anila being understood as the name normally used for Vāyu when numbered among the Vasus.
  • Anumati (“divine favor” in Sanskrit, Devanagari: अनुमति), also known as Chandrama, is a lunar deity and goddess of wealth, intellect, children, spirituality, and prosperity. Her vehicle is Krisha Mrigam or Krishna Jinka (Blackbuck).
  • Ap In Hinduism, it is also the name of the deva, a personification of water, one of the Vasus in most later Puranic lists.
  • Apam Napatis an eminent figure of the Indo-Iranian pantheon. In Hinduism, Apām Napāt is the god of fresh water, such as in rivers and lakes. In Zoroastrianism, Apąm Napāt is also a divinity of water, see also Burz.
  • Aranyaniis a goddess of the forests and the animals that dwell within them.

Aranyani has the distinction of having one of the most descriptive hymns in the Rigveda dedicated to her, in which she is described as being elusive, fond of quiet glades in the jungle, and fearless of remote places.

  • Aravan also known as Iravat (इरावत्, Irāvat)[1] and Iravant, is a minor character from the Hindu epic of Mahabharata. The son of Pandava prince Arjuna (one of the main heroes of the Mahabharata) and the Naga princess Ulupi, Iravan is the central god of the cult of Kuttantavar (Tamil: கூத்தாண்டவர்) —which is also the name commonly given to him in that cult—and plays a major role in the cult of Draupadi.
  • Ardhanari is a composite androgynous form of the Hindu god Shiva and his consort Parvati (also known as Devi, Shakti and Uma in this icon). Ardhanarishvara is depicted as half male and half female, split down the middle. The right half is usually the male Shiva, illustrating his traditional attributes.
  • ArdraThe Hindu myth associated to Ardra is that of Taraka. Taraka is an asura who is granted invulnerability by Brahma.[1]
  • Arjuna-(pronounced [ɐrˈɟunɐ] in classical Sanskrit) (lit. ‘bright’ or ‘silver’ (cf. Latin argentum)) is the third of the Pandavas, the sons and princes of Pandu, who with Krishna, is considered to be the hero of the Hindu epic Mahabharata.
  • Aruna is a personification of the reddish glow of the rising Sun,[1] which is believed to have spiritual powers. The presence of Aruṇá, the coming of day, is invoked in Brahmin prayers to Surya.
  • Arundhati is the wife of the sage Vashista, one of the seven sages (Saptarshi) who are identified with the Ursa Major. She is identified with the morning star and also with the star Alcor which forms a double star with Mizar (identified as Vashista) in Ursa Major.
  • Aryaman is one of the early Vedic deities (devas). His name signifies “bosom friend”. He is the third son of Aditi. He is an Aditya, a solar deity. He is supposed to be the chief of the manes and the Milky Way is supposed to be his path.
  • Ashapura –Mata no Madh is one of aspect devi. Her temples are mainly found in Gujarat.
  • Aslesais the 9th Nakshatra among the 27 Nakshatras in Hindu astrology. Ashlesha is also known as the Clinging Star or Nāga.[1] It is known as Hydra. It extends from 16:40 to 30:00 Cancri.[2]
  • Asura(Sanskrit: असुर,[1] Sanskrit ásu – “life force”.[2] Compare: Æsir. Also see: Ahura Mazda) are non-suras, a different group of power-seeking deities besides the suras, sometimes considered naturalists, or nature-beings. They are the forces of chaos that are in constant battle with the Devas.
  • Asvayujau is a goddess of good luck, joy and happiness.
  • Aswiniis the first nakshatra (lunar mansion) in Hindu astrology, corresponding to the head of Aries, including the stars β and γ Arietis. The name aśvinī is used by Varahamihira (6th century). The older name of the asterism, found in the Atharvaveda (AVS 19.7; in the dual) and in Panini (4.3.36), was aśvayúj “harnessing horses”
  • Ayyappan is a Hindu deity worshiped in a number of shrines across India. Ayyappan is believed to be an incarnation of Dharma Sasta, who is the offspring of Shiva and Vishnu (as Mohini, is the only female avatar of the God Vishnu) and is generally depicted in a yogic posture

B

C

D

G

H

I

J


Jagaddhatri



K

L

M

N

P

R

S

T


Tara



U

V

Y

The Rigveda speaks of Thirty-three gods called the Tridasha (‘Three times ten’). They consisted of the 12 Adityas, the 8 Vasus, the 11 Rudras and the 2 AshvinsIndra also called Śakra, lord of the gods, is the first of the 33 followed by Agni. Some of these brother gods were invoked in pairs such as Indra-Agni, Mitra-Varuna and Soma-Rudra.

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